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Where Designers Read Design
Updated: 14 min 58 sec ago

Learn HTML Online, Just as Nature Intended

Thu, 05/29/2014 - 05:05
Admit it: Your seven-year-old nephew could out-HTML tag you any day and you think that a Cascading Style Sheet is something with a thread count. That's where Mediabistro comes in. Our mothership has just confirmed its next online course in HTML and CSS, and it's never too early to start planning ahead. Over four fun-filled weeks, web design design guru Laura Galbraith will guide you through a variety of web page production techniques, from column-based layouts and search engine optimization to semantic markup and advanced CSS styles. The online learning fun begins September 15, and by Halloween, you'll have brought a pre-designed webpage to life through the magic of HTML. Preview the course syllabus and register here.

New Career Opportunities Daily: The best jobs in media.

Categories: News

Seven Questions for Jessica Hische

Wed, 05/28/2014 - 12:00
"The basis of any word is a single letter," says self-described "letterer, illustrator, and crazy cat lady" Jessica Hische, known for performing stunningly beautiful typographical feats for the likes of Wes Anderson, Penguin Books, The New York Times, and—be still our justice-loving hearts—John Hodgman. Among her latest projects is a stationery collection for the Luxe Project, a Moo initiative that pairs top creative talent with Moo's deluxe business cards, letterheads, and notecards, and then gives 100% of net proceeds to the designer's charity of choice (Hische's feline-friendly pick: the ASPCA). She made time in her busy, bicoastal—San Francisco and Brooklyn—schedule to answer our questions about the luxe letterforms adapted from her Daily Drop Cap project, her book jacket for The Circle by Dave Eggers, and more. For those not familiar with Daily Drop Cap, what is it and how did it come about? I started Daily Drop Cap because, when I left working at Louise Fili Ltd., I wanted an excuse to draw letterforms every day, even when I wasn’t being paid to by clients. I wanted a way to experiment and develop my lettering skills since I was about to step out on my own, away from the daily mentoring of Louise. Originally, I had planned on doing an alphabet a week instead of a letter a day, but decided quickly that I wasn’t up for a challenge that enormous at the time. I gave myself the goal of twelve alphabets, a number that seemed daunting but doable, and for a year and a half I drew a letter every single day. It ended up becoming the thing that really kicked my career into full swing and made people pay attention to the work I was doing. What did you create for the Luxe Project? My collection for Moo uses a selection of my Daily Drop Caps, transforming the original artwork into sophisticated monograms by switching the complex original color palettes to two-color. I chose letters that I thought would appeal to many people—sometimes the letters I created for Daily Drop Cap specifically referenced something I was doing that day and wouldn't work as stationery monograms— and tried to pick gender neutral letterforms when possible. The letters are integrated into simple but beautiful designs which could work for anyone, be they a designer or just a lover of letters. I used the typeface Router—which I love—made by a type design friend Jeremy Mickel. What led you to select the ASPCA to receive all net proceeds? I adopted my two cats from the ASPCA in New York and just love what they do to put misplaced animals in good homes. I'm a huge animal lover—it's embarrassing how much I dote on my two cats—and love supporting an organization that obviously cares so deeply about animals. continued...

New Career Opportunities Daily: The best jobs in media.

Categories: News

Design Jobs: Smashbox Studios, MIT Technology Review, Washingtonian Magazine

Tue, 05/27/2014 - 18:30
This week, Smashbox Studios is hiring a bookings director, while MIT Technology Review is seeking a deputy art director. Washingtonian Magazine needs an art director, and Madavor Media is on the hunt for a graphic designer. Get the scoop on these openings and more below, and find additional just-posted gigs on Mediabistro. Bookings Director Smashbox Studios (Culver City, CA) Deputy Art Director MIT Technology Review (Cambridge, MA) Art Director Washingtonian Magazine (Washington, DC) Graphic Designer Madavor Media (Braintree, MA) Senior Designer Everyday Health (New York, NY) Find more great design jobs on the UnBeige job board. Looking to hire? Tap into our network of talented UnBeige pros and post a risk-free job listing. For real-time openings and employment news, follow @MBJobPost.

New Career Opportunities Daily: The best jobs in media.

Categories: News

Derk Reilink Redesigns Tape Dispenser with ‘ClickTape’

Mon, 05/26/2014 - 12:06
Unwilling to cede precious desktop real estate to a bulky, weighted tape dispenser nor to look upon the unsightly clear plastic one that accompanies a roll, we've long relegated tape to the drawer, where it spends its days in the company of foreign coins, our second-favorite scissors, and a thicket of novelty USB flash drives. Derk Reilink knew there had to be a better way. The Dutch designer took on the challenge of building a better tape dispenser as part of his graduate studies in industrial design and engineering at the University of Twente in Enschede, Netherlands. "I started to experiment with basic shapes and found the shape of the tape itself to be the best shape for the dispenser," Reilink tells us. "By taking out a section of the ring shape I could create a symmetric chain-linked design." The result is ClickTape, a minimalist dispenser that is useful and portable—think of it as the practical, low-key sibling of the bottle for Bulgari's Omnia fragrance. continued...

New Career Opportunities Daily: The best jobs in media.

Categories: News

Quote of Note | Elizabeth Diller

Mon, 05/26/2014 - 05:05
"Whenever I ask Siri for directions or a recommendation, I also ask her a trick question. Her answers are usually wacky. She scolds me for cursing, which I love, but she has no problem with ethics. If I say, 'Remind me to rob a bank at 3 p.m.,' she responds, 'Here's your reminder for today at 3 p.m.: Rob a bank. Shall I create it?' She takes orders without imposing judgments, unlike some of my staff." -Architect Elizabeth Diller, partner at Diller Scofidio + Renfro, in the Wall Street Journal

New Career Opportunities Daily: The best jobs in media.

Categories: News

Photographer Michael Schmidt Wins Prix Pictet

Thu, 05/22/2014 - 13:57
Berlin-based photographer Michael Schmidt is the winner of the third Prix Pictet. Sponsored by Swiss bank Pictet & Cie and with a purse of 100,000 Swiss francs (approximately $112,000, at current exchange), the entry-by-nomination international photography competition seeks to promote sustainability. This year’s theme was “Consumption.” Schmidt's monumental "Lebensmittel" (food stuff) project, made between 2006 and 2010, was chosen by a jury that included Whitney curator Elisabeth Sussman and photographer Luc Delahaye, who won the Prix Pictet in 2012. "There were many potential winners but, after much debate, we finally agreed to award the Prix Pictet to Michael Schmidt whose 'Lebensmittel' is an epic and hugely topical investigation into the ways in which we feed ourselves," said jury chair Sir David King yesterday evening at London's Victoria and Albert Museum, where Kofi Annan was on hand to announce the winner. Schmidt, 68, was not present due to severe illness. The twelve photographers shortlisted for the Prix Pictet included Rineke Dijkstra, Boris Mikhailov, Allan Sekula (who passed away last August at the age of 62), and Laurie Simmons. An exhibition of work shortlisted for Prix Pictet is on view through June 14 at the V&A.

New Career Opportunities Daily: The best jobs in media.

Categories: News

Inspiring IBM Design Lives On in Tumblr Form

Thu, 05/22/2014 - 11:31
In the course of working on projects for IBM, art director Sue Murphy was forever discovering graphic design gold in the company's deep archives. "Because of the nature of the Internet, not a lot of this is available easily online," notes Murphy, an art director at Oglivy & Mather in New York. "Or God forbid–hi res!" She is changing that with Good Design Is Good Business, a Tumblr that takes its name from a 1973 speech by Thomas Watson, Jr., IBM's second president. The online collection of posters, by the likes of Ogilvy, Paul Rand, and Carl De Torres, is sure to make you THINK. Like this post? Then you'll love LiquidTreat, a weekly newsletter designed to quench your creative thirst. Sip generously from past issues and subscribe here.

New Career Opportunities Daily: The best jobs in media.

Categories: News

Abbott Miller Designs Exhibition Celebrating Century of Type

Thu, 05/22/2014 - 11:05
Spending your Memorial Day Weekend in New York City? Don't miss "Century: 100 Years of Type in Design," on view through June 18 at the AIGA National Design Center. Part of AIGA's centennial celebration, the fontastic—and free—exhibition was created by Pentagram partner and AIGA medalist Abbott Miller (we are eagerly anticipating his new book, Design and Content, coming soon from Princeton Architectural Press) in partnership with Monotype. It runs the chronological and technological gamut from Akzidenz Grotesk to Zapf Dingbats with works drawn from the collections of The Type Directors Club, Condé Nast, Hamilton Wood Type & Printing Museum, The Herb Lubalin Study Center at Cooper Union, and many more. Here's a preview:

New Career Opportunities Daily: The best jobs in media.

Categories: News

Seven Questions for Giulio Iacchetti

Wed, 05/21/2014 - 21:26
More than 10,000 people visited WantedDesign, which wrapped up on Monday in New York. A highlight among the more than 60 exhibitors was Italian design powerhouse Alessi, which presented projects stemming from research and workshops the company has conducted in collaboration with several young designers around the world. Veteran Alessi designer Giulio Iacchetti was on hand to showcase his new "Noè" collection of wine accessories. The name is a nod to Noah, the biblical patriarch. "He is not just famous for building the ark, but also for his passion for wine," says Iacchetti, who is based in Milan. "And it is said that he invented it after being the first to experiment with vine cultivation." We popped open a bottle of bubbly—with the aid of his bottle-shaped opener—and asked him seven questions. What was the concept for the Noè set? The inspiring concept for these objects designed to serve and preserve wine comes by a strong formal reference to existing wine imagery, so the bottle holder refers to a cluster of grapes, the Champagne stopper recalls those corks used to hermetically seal Champagne bottles, the shape of the Champagne cork opener is inspired by the outline of a bottle, and finally, the drop-stop ring is truly the engagement between us and wine! What has distinguished your collaborations with Alessi from those with other companies? When I think of Italian design and design companies, I think immediately of Alessi. Alessi could be really considered the “dream factory”—as Alberto Alessi defined his company years ago—for its exceptional capability to combine real industrial productivity with the openness to collect in its catalog many different products categories. Every time I go to Crusinallo [Alessi headquarters], I personally live a life-long dream. continued...

New Career Opportunities Daily: The best jobs in media.

Categories: News

Murray Olderman Talks About Becoming a Cartoonist

Wed, 05/21/2014 - 21:20
Murray Olderman has had a storied career as a syndicated newspaper columnist and cartoonist. Although this 92-year-old is officially retired, he's actually working on a new book, comprised of illustrations and cartoons of people in sports he's known and drawn. In our latest So What Do You Do column, we spoke with Olderman about journalism school in the 1940s, his most memorable interview and how he got started as a cartoonist: I was captivated as a teenager (when I was also writing sports for a county weekly) by the looks of cartoons on sports pages and started copying them, gradually perfecting my techniques through trial and error. I was first published in the Columbia Missourian, a city newspaper paper produced by the Missouri School of Journalism, in my junior year. My first hire, by the McClatchy Newspapers of Sacramento, was as a sports cartoonist. I have written and drawn conjunctively. No preference. A lot of guys have written sports. A lot of guys have drawn sports. Few have done both. For more from Olderman, read: So What Do You Do, Murray Olderman, Iconic Sports Journalist and Cartoonist?

New Career Opportunities Daily: The best jobs in media.

Categories: News

Design Jobs: Williams New York, Columbia Business School, Northstar Travel Media

Tue, 05/20/2014 - 18:30
This week, Williams New York is hiring an art director/designer, while Columbia Business School needs a graphic designer. Northstar Travel Media is seeking a digital graphic designer, and New South Media is on the hunt for a senior graphic designer. Get the scoop on these openings and more below, and find additional just-posted gigs on Mediabistro. Art Director/Designer Williams New York (New York, NY) Graphic Designer Columbia Business School (New York, NY) Digital Graphic Designer Northstar Travel Media (Secaucus, NJ) Senior Graphic Designer New South Media (Morgantown, WV) Photo Editor Birchbox (New York, NY) Find more great design jobs on the UnBeige job board. Looking to hire? Tap into our network of talented UnBeige pros and post a risk-free job listing. For real-time openings and employment news, follow @MBJobPost.

New Career Opportunities Daily: The best jobs in media.

Categories: News

Twitter Along with UnBeige

Tue, 05/20/2014 - 10:50
Famed literary critic Lionel Trilling once described Henry James as a "social twitterer." Sure, he meant it as an insult, but it makes us feel better about having joined the tweeting masses. Look to the UnBeige Twitter feed for up-to-the-minute newsbites, event snippets, links of interest, design trivia, and our exclusive photo of Rem Koolhaas in mid-ponder—it makes for smashing smartphone wallpaper.

New Career Opportunities Daily: The best jobs in media.

Categories: News

Seven Questions for David Weeks

Mon, 05/19/2014 - 13:03
Works from the Salvers Collection, on view through June 20 at David Weeks Studio. A second set of the Salvers debuts today in Paris as part of the "American Design in Paris" exhibition at the Mona Bismarck American Center for Art & Culture. You probably know David Weeks for his stunning lighting, fluidly formed furniture, or craggily adorable wooden creatures. Last fall his studio branched out from Brooklyn to Manhattan, with a new standalone atelier in Tribeca that is part design studio, part showspace for one-of-a-kind prototypes, collaborations, and work from other artists. It is currently home to a month-long exhibition of the Salvers Collection, designed in conjunction with Alex Rasmussen from Neil Feay Studio. Weeks made time to tell us more about the project as well as his new collaboration with Flavor Paper (spoiler alert: gorillas are involved!), what's on his desk, and the best advice he's ever received. How are things at your new Tribeca space? Has having a standalone atelier affected your creative process/output/how you spend your day? Things are great! Challenging, exciting, exhausting. We had run the numbers before I decided to open a dedicated showroom and they are playing out as planned. I didn’t plan on the level of focus and complexity that it has ended up taking. To have a public venue while running a design and manufacturing company is hard. It’s also exhilarating and fun to be in control of my own destiny. How did your collaboration with Alex Rasmussen come about? I met Alex a year ago, and we discussed collaborating almost immediately. He has such a phenomenal facility at his beck and call at Neal Frey. It’s hard to imagine. How would you describe the six unique designs in the Salvers Collection? The collection ended up being a reaction to what his CNC [Computer Numerical Control] machine could do. I designed my pieces using the stock material and cutters they had on hand, and tweaked the jigs that hold the piece to the machines. The great thing about CNC to me is that it will do whatever you tell it. There is no need to make things at right angles. It’s an opportunity to visualize a unorthodox form, draw it, and have a huge industrial machine create it. continued...

New Career Opportunities Daily: The best jobs in media.

Categories: News

MZ Wallace Teams with Food52 to Build a Better Market Tote

Fri, 05/16/2014 - 13:01
New York City-based MZ Wallace is our go-to source for smartly designed, beautifully made bags in materials ranging from seasonless leather and sturdy canvas to quilted nylon and metallic Kevlar—in weights and colors that change with the seasons (we're partial to a full-bodied shade of gray they call "seagull" and keep the UnBeige fleet of iPads sheathed in MZW printed haircalf pouches, but this summer is all about the Pollock-style Metro Tote). Now the company has joined forces with online culinary commmity Food52 to design a better market tote: ideally used to whisk just-picked produce from farmstand to kitchen, we suspect it will work just as well hauling more conventional groceries. But what color should it be? They've narrowed the field of chromatic contenders to forest green and navy blue, and the winning hue will be decided by an online vote. Make your preference known by Monday at 11:59 p.m. and be entered to win a tote before it's released this fall.

New Career Opportunities Daily: The best jobs in media.

Categories: News

See the World Through Yves Klein-Blue Colored Lenses

Wed, 05/14/2014 - 13:05
Having missed their splashy coming-out party at Colette in Paris, we first encountered a pair of Yves Klein Blue sunglasses on the chiseled face of a gentleman at the Munich airport. The stunning ultramarine specs, made by indie eyewear brand Etnia Barcelona, mark the first time that the Yves Klein Archive has authorized a brand to use the exact color patented by the artist as "International Klein Blue." You can find the aviator-style sunglasses at the New Museum shop and the full collection at Etnia Barcelona. And did we mention the good cause? Royalties from the Klein collection go to OrphanAid, a non-profit organization that develops programs and projects to help vulnerable children and families in Ghana.

New Career Opportunities Daily: The best jobs in media.

Categories: News

Anonymous Tips: Because Sharing Is Caring

Wed, 05/14/2014 - 10:20
If we've heard it once, we've heard it a thousand times: "I could tell you this Big Design News, but then I'd have to kill you." Now you can give us the scoop and skip the messy murder plot, thanks to our "Anonymous Tips" box, which the Mediabistro tech wizards have placed at the top right of this page. Your mission, should you choose to accept it: Type in your news—design happenings, gossip, movements of the Revolving Door, a designer's hidden talent, or any newsy, design-y morsel—and click "send." We'll get the news, you'll retain your air of mystery.

New Career Opportunities Daily: The best jobs in media.

Categories: News

Collective Design Fair Throws a Few Curves

Tue, 05/13/2014 - 19:14
The Collective Design Fair returned to the Frieze-time fray this year, and we sent Nancy Lazarus to check out the new venue and the many curvaceous works on view. A screen by Taher Chemirik was the undulating centerpiece of Galerie BSL's booth at Collective. International in scope yet moderate in scale, New York's Collective Design Fair debuted last year "to provide new commercial and educational platforms for vintage and contemporary design," according to Steven Learner, the fair's creative director. The sophomore edition ran from May 8-11 in a new venue—Skylight at Moynihan Station—and added to existing strengths in Scandinavian design and ceramics with a new focus on wearable art. We chatted with some of the 36 exhibitors and joined a tour led by Cooper-Hewitt curator Sarah Coffin to round up five highlights. Todd Merrill 20th Century Studio Contemporary, New York City: "A tour de force of woodworking" was Coffin's apt description of Irish designer Joseph Walsh's Enignum Canopy Bed (at right), since it consists of ribbons of olive ash wood positioned on a raised platform. Walsh explained the craftsmanship involved in the accompanying materials: "In the Enignum series of works I have stripped wood into thin layers, manipulating and reconstructing them into free form compositions. The title derives from the Latin words 'enigma' (mystery) and ‘lignum’ (wood).” Sienna Patti Gallery, Lenox, Massachusetts: "Jacqueline Lillie's beaded jewelry plays off of Wiener Werkstätte, but is updated to be contemporary," said Coffin. The French-born, Vienna-based designer works with materials including glass beads, corian, and stainless steel. "In addition to form and function, I also insist on flexibility," Lillie has said. "That's essential because all good jewelry should adapt to the wearer and be an extension of that person's character." continued...

New Career Opportunities Daily: The best jobs in media.

Categories: News

Design Jobs: Lincoln Center, Everyday Health, American Girl

Tue, 05/13/2014 - 18:30
This week, Lincoln Center is hiring a graphic designer, while Everyday Health needs a senior designer. American Girl is seeking a senior art director of content, and College of the Holy Cross is on the hunt for a director of creative services. Get the scoop on these openings and more below, and find additional just-posted gigs on Mediabistro. Graphic Designer Lincoln Center (New York, NY) Senior Designer Everyday Health (New York, NY) Senior Art Director - Content American Girl (Middleton, WI) Director, Creative Services College of the Holy Cross (Worcester, MA) Senior Designer Time Out New York (New York, NY) Find more great design jobs on the UnBeige job board. Looking to hire? Tap into our network of talented UnBeige pros and post a risk-free job listing. For real-time openings and employment news, follow @MBJobPost.

New Career Opportunities Daily: The best jobs in media.

Categories: News

Quote of Note | Harold Koda

Tue, 05/13/2014 - 11:45
"[A]t the end of his life, if you went down to the street and said, 'Charles James lives there,' nobody would care. But think about Anna Piaggi—she had Antonio [Lopez] do all these drawings of his work immediately after he died. The people who were really savvy never forgot him. It's just that he was never a household name, even when he was at his peak. He was always known as being at the cutting edge of the design world. I think what will happen with this exhibition is that fashionable people will come in, and they'll be inspired by the colors and the shapes, but they will [translate] them in a more traditional way so that [the clothes] can be easily manufactured. But I think the people who will come away with even more inspiration will be industrial designers, graphic designers, and architects, because you will see such interesting ways of thinking." -Curator-in-charge of the Costume Institute Harold Koda, who organized "Charles James: Beyond Fashion" with Jan Glier Reeder. The exhibition is on view through August 10 at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Pictured: Clover Leaf Ball Gown designed in 1953 by Charles James

New Career Opportunities Daily: The best jobs in media.

Categories: News

National Building Museum Explores ‘Designing for Disaster’

Mon, 05/12/2014 - 13:37
The Washington Monument reopens to the public today—nearly three years after sustaining severe damage from the 5.8-magnitude earthquake that shook the East Coast in August 2011. Total cost of repairs to the towering obelisk? Approximately $15 million. Amidst rising costs associated with natural disasters, the National Building Museum is exploring new approaches to disaster resilience in “Designing for Disaster,” an exhibition that runs through August 2 at the Washington, D.C. institution. Organized by the destructive forces associated with each of the elements—earth, air, fire, and water, the show is a mix of case studies, artifacts (including singed opera glasses from the Waldo Canyon wildfire, and stone fragments from the earthquake-damaged National Cathedral), and immersive experiences (DIY disasters?) such as a “wall of wind” against which visitors can compare how various roof shapes perform in hurricane-force gales. Those that find even simulated disasters overwhelming can take refuge in the FEMA-specified tornado safe room.

New Career Opportunities Daily: The best jobs in media.

Categories: News

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